How To Write A Book And Become An Author In 9 Simple Steps

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How To Write A Book

You want to know how to write a book but you are not sure where you should start

Part One – The Basics

If you have ever dreamed of writing a book, you’ll find no better time than now to do it.

All you need to do is write between 40,000 and 80,000 words or more, and you are done.

Easy, huh?

Well, yes and no. It is not the number of words that is important, it is how you put your words together.

 

“At the end of all this being-determined-to-be-a-jack-of-all-trades, I think I’m better off just sitting down and putting a hundred thousand words in a cunning order.” Douglas Adams

 

The writing process is about painting a mental picture with words that readers can then imagine in their mind’s eye.

Famously, Ian Rankin never describes Inspector Rebus in his many books.

However, within the words and lines of the Rebus stories, readers can create their own realistic image of him. Quite short, a little rotund with a beer belly and rarely smiles is my image.

If you have read books by famous writers like Stephen King, James Clavell or Dan Brown, you have experienced how well they can paint mental pictures.

The ability to communicate with a reader’s imagination is not restricted to a fiction book. It is just as important for a nonfiction book and even self-help books.

 

So where do you start with writing a book?

If you are reading this article, you have probably read many others. This is a good sign that you are keen and ready to learn how to write a book and start writing it.

There are no strict rules, however. Every writer who wrote a book takes a different approach, but there are some basic steps that most use when they start a new book writing project.

You will certainly find what works best for you over time, but the following tips will help you put together a framework that will keep you focused and motivated during the process of writing your book.

 

Your Idea

1. It always starts with a brilliant book idea

Maybe you want to write a science fiction space opera, a period romance or a cosy mystery.

No matter what genre you prefer, you will need to dream up a good idea for your plot.

The best way to do this is to forget about writing your book for the moment and concentrate solely on writing one or two sentence stories.

 

Perhaps Douglas Adams wrote, “Just before Earth gets blown up a man escapes with an alien and becomes the last human in the Universe, and he gets awfully confused about it all.”

 

Think about a bestselling book that you read and liked, and try to reduce the story to one or two sentences.

If you can do that, you are ready to create your own.

Every time you have an idea, write it down in no more than two sentences and make sure you keep a list of all your ideas.

I have had a file for years where I keep my little sentence ideas. Most have never been used, but I never delete them.

You never know!

One book I wrote came from an idea that I had filed away more than four years before.

Set yourself a target and try to find one new idea every day for two weeks. Out of the fourteen, one will jump out at you as the best one.

 

Your Plan

2. You can’t build a house by starting with the roof

Any project needs some type of plan.

There are two generally accepted types of authors.

Authors who plan every detail of a story in advance and know exactly how it will end.

They draft meticulous outlines before they do any actual writing. You could call them Plotters who plan every detail.

Then there are authors who often say that they let their characters lead them through the story.

It is a highly creative method and has been a successful strategy for many.

Perhaps you could call them Flyers as they really do fly by the seat of their pants.

But even the Flyers need a basis from where to start. An idea, and a rough outline as to how the story will develop.

Many writers start by writing only the chapter titles. These can be changed later during the writing process, but they do give you a great foundation when you get to the writing of your book.

Another way to prepare is to use writing software that is especially adapted to book writing and not a word processor like Microsoft Word.

Book writing software usually has added functions so you can keep notes and ideas, plan characters, timeline events and work on individual chapters of your book without having to scroll through a long document.

 

The Blank Page

3. Time to do something about the dreaded white page

Every book starts for a writer with a blank white page. Scary.

But it is not such a big deal really. It only takes a few words, and the page is no longer blank.

Start with your first chapter idea as your first few words, and then hit return.

Now write a subject and verb, and you are on your way. It was …, there were …, some think .., I have … or, she thought.

Don’t worry about what you write; just get fifty words on there, and you will be away.

You can, and definitely will come back to re-write them later, but for now, just write.

Refer back to your one or two sentence idea to focus on the task, and once you’ve written a few hundred words, you will have started writing your book.

 

Write

4. Write, write and just write, no matter how long it takes

Some say that writing a book is hard work, but I disagree.

It is an immensely rewarding process, and once you get through the first few paragraphs of the first chapter, it can become a wonderful compulsion.

But one very important point to remember is that you are writing your first draft. It will not be perfect so don’t aim for perfection in any form.

Turn off any grammar checkers you might have, and even spell checkers. If you are an all thumbs and a slow typist like me, you might want to keep your spell checker on for typos, but honestly, you will write better with no distractions.

You have probably read already about setting yourself a daily word count. I am six of one and half a dozen about the other about this advice.

If you think you need the discipline, then yes, set yourself writing goals. One thousand words a day is not that difficult to achieve, and doubly so on Sundays.

At that rate, you will have written the first draft of your book in two to three months.

It is not difficult to set aside parts of your day as your writing time. It doesn’t need to be in one hit though.

Twenty minutes after breakfast, half an hour at lunchtime and stop watching TV in the evening can all add up to one thousand words a day quite easily.

On the other hand, you can write when, well, when your writing juices are ready to flow.

I remember when I wrote February The Fifth, I almost, (pardon the expression) vomitted the story. I wrote the first draft in less than a month.

But it took me over a year and a half years to write the first draft of Louis, due to the amount of research I needed to do for almost every part of the book.

Every book I have written has taken a different route. I wrote some with word count goals, while others evolved as and when I wanted to write.

If you are planning on writing your first book though, I would advise setting a daily writing goal. It will help to keep you motivated.

 

Blocked

5. I’m stuck, I’ve got writer’s block and I’ll never finish this book

Welcome to being an author!

There will definitely be times when the words just will not flow. So what can you do?

The best advice is to stop writing when the words come agonisingly slowly, or not at all. Walk away, change your mind and do something that you enjoy.

Some writers like to go for a long walk, while others bake a cake or go to a bakery and buy one.

Something else that works for some is to write a short story or a poem to change your mindset but still keep writing.

You can always read a book for a while. How long is it since you read Harry Potter?

Once your mind is clear again, then get back to writing your first draft.

You can read more in this article about 17 ways to cure writer’s block.

 

Your Draft

6. It’s not a book yet, it’s your first draft

There will be no book until you finish writing your first draft.

It will not be perfect, so don’t worry about anything except getting your ideas out and writing your story.

But do make sure you save, file and back up your manuscript meticulously.

Don’t worry about editing, typos, spelling mistakes or plot holes. Just write.

Writing your first draft is the most creative part of writing your book, and you should feel free to let your imagination run wild.

During this stage, you will discover that ideas can come at any time, so keep a notebook handy, or use your phone to jot down any ideas that pop into your mind.

Tip! One small piece of advice I give to new authors is never to write in your mind.

Words often flow very easily when you are relaxing, readying for sleep, or bored to tears at work.

But never trust your mind to remember all these words and ideas for your next writing session. Take notes immediately.

Another point to ignore while writing is your story’s word count. If your writing software shows a word count, turn it off. A great story is not judged by how many words it takes to tell it.

If your story takes 30,000 words or 120,000 words to tell, it doesn’t matter.

Write your draft and forget about the distraction of numbers and totals. Mathematics has no part in the creative process of writing a book.

Just write!

Once you have finished and typed “The End”, you will feel fantastic.

Your last task will be to come up with a title for your new book.

Read More Here: Do your research before you decide on your book title.

 

The End

7. The End is only the beginning

Once you have finished your first draft, the hard work really begins. So take a break, and forget about your book for a couple of weeks at least.

It is going to take weeks, months or even longer for you to work through the stages of ‘taming’ your draft.

But once you are ready, start working on your second draft.

Importantly, DO NOT overwrite your first draft manuscript!

Save it safely and back it up. Then make a new copy that you will use for your second draft.

This is when you will make changes, write additional scenes, re-write parts, correct plot errors or add plot twists.

It is still a draft, so again, don’t worry too much about correcting grammar, punctuation and line editing. Concentrate on your story.

When you have finished your second draft, it will be time to start on the third.

This is when you should start doing your thorough grammar and spell check. A premium tool such as Grammarly is ideal for this stage and will help you find most of your errors and typos.

Another option that is becoming very popular with authors is ProwritingAid. It is packed with reports that can help you improve the standard of your writing. It also handles long documents such as manuscripts with ease.

And then perhaps, it will be time for a fourth draft.

 

Help

8. Now you need help with your book

The next stage is when you to let go of your story and start the process of turning your story into a book.

You will need an editor or at least someone else who is competent at line editing, grammar correction and accurate proofreading.

If you can afford or know someone who has skills in developmental editing, even better.

It is impossible for an author to be critical enough to do this work. You have to get independent help in preparing and fine-tuning your manuscript.

The last stage in the process is to use beta readers to give feedback on your book. The more the better.

Then, once you have all the corrections, edits and reader feedback, make the necessary changes to improve your book one last time before you even think about querying agents, looking for a publisher or self-publishing.

 

Publishing

9. Getting your book published

The most popular self- publishing platforms for new authors

Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP). KDP is Amazon’s Kindle ebook publishing service and now also publishes paperbacks. As far as book sales go, Amazon is the undisputed market leader in ebook and book sales.

Smashwords. An aggregating publisher and distributor of ebooks to Apple, Barnes and Noble, Kobo and Scribd amongst many others.

Draft2Digital (D2D). Similar to Smashwords, Draft2Digital is an ebook distributor to Apple, Barnes and Noble, Kobo and Scribd.

However, D2D can now also publish your paperback print book with Createspace. There is a review of Draft2Digital available here.

All of these service providers have well-written Help sections to guide you through the necessary steps to publish your book.

 

Formatting your Word document for publishing

You will need to format your Microsoft Word document before you upload it for publishing on any of the service providers mentioned above.

It is important, especially for an ebook, that your formatting is consistent throughout your book.

You can read our tutorial on how to do a comprehensive clean and format of a Word file. It is sometimes called the Nuclear Approach.

Or you can watch the following video tutorial on how to format your Word file.

Should you wish to publish in paperback, there are a few providers, but from my experience, only Amazon KDP offers a totally free service to publish in paperback form.

If you publish with either, there will only be a charge if you wish to buy copies of your book.

Their prices are very reasonable, though, at around $3.85 per copy, plus postage for a 250-page book. As mentioned earlier, both Amazon KDP and Draft2Digital also offer paperback publishing.

If you wish to publish an audiobook version as well, please read the article in the link below.

Further reading: A detailed article on the costs of publishing a book in all formats including audiobooks.

Further reading: Be aware that self-publishing and vanity publishing are very different. Do not confuse the two.

 

Part Two – Writing for readers

Write A Book For Your Readers

If you want to know how to write a book, it starts with having a writing process

All good writing starts with an idea and a plan.

When you sit down to write anything, the first thing you need to have is a good idea.

It doesn’t matter if it is a blog post, an article, a short story, a fiction book or a nonfiction book, you need to draft a plan before you start writing.

Writing an outline is the first part of writing a book. It doesn’t need to be overly long, but you should note how your plot will begin, develop, and end.

Don’t worry about all the small details. Keep it to a few paragraphs, or perhaps one page at most.

For some writers, noting rough chapter titles helps them clarify how the novel or non-fiction story will develop in a logical progression.

Your plan is sometimes the hardest part. But once you’ve written the framework for your book idea, you’ll find it helps enormously when it comes time to write your first draft.

If you have more than one book idea, write an outline for each one.

It takes a long time to write a book. If you can be clear about which idea is going to be the best, you can then devote your writing time to that one project.

Writing books, or even short stories takes time.

But once you’ve started on chapter one, allocated yourself a daily word count and made it a writing habit, you know that you will finish writing your story.

 

But before you start … STOP right here!

stop here

You have a great plan, but it is missing one extremely vital step

Too many authors now rush into writing and publishing a book.

How often have I heard this?

“I wrote a book, but no one is buying it. I did a free ebook giveaway and all the social media stuff on Facebook and Instagram and everything. What’s wrong with people?” 

People? Who are these people that have something wrong with them?

There is nothing wrong with people, but there is definitely something wrong.

The problem is in thinking that everyone will want to buy your book. In fact, the exact opposite is true.

Very few people will be interested in your book. But if you can imagine who these few people are, you then might have some chance of success.

Target readers

When you finish writing your book outline, ask yourself this simple question.

Who will read want to my story?

Your answer will involve demographics and your book genre.

In other words, will teenagers want to read your book about a World War Two fighter pilot? Will women between 45 and 60 want to read your book about a teenage vampire?

Who will be interested in reading about overcoming depression or surviving divorce? Millennial males?

You want to write a romance story, but what type of romance reader will it be for?

Hot erotic, cosy romantic mystery or historical period romance. Will men between 18 and 45 rush to read it?

If you write fiction and you can’t identify the very specific genre of your book or the gender and age of potential readers, you will waste a lot of time and money promoting your book to – everyone.

 

Take a hint from Kindle book scammers

Yes, that’s right. Look at what the crooks on Kindle Unlimited are doing, and why they are raking in so much money.

Do you think they target biographies and memoirs, travel, religion & spirituality, poetry, and war novels?

No, they target erotic romance, hot erotica, science fiction and teen paranormal fantasy. Why? Because these are popular genres with lots of potential readers and book buyers.

Not that you want to become a scammer. But it is a very good lesson in knowing and then focussing on your target market and readers.

 

Related reading: Publishing Self-Help Books Has Huge SEO Advantages

 

You must know who you are writing for

You don’t have the advantage of being a bestselling author like Stephen King, Dan Brown or J.K. Rowling with her Harry Potter brand.

But readers do buy good books, and a lot of self-published authors have had a bestselling book. Think here of E. L. James.

The difference between success and failure in writing a book can be as simple as knowing who you’ll write it for and imagining your potential readers as you do.

It will focus your writing, your characters, and the type of vocabulary you use.

Writing a book and then trying to decide if it is general fiction, contemporary fiction, science fiction or romance is a sure sign that a writer has no idea about who will be interested in reading the book.

Then, when you finish writing your book and it goes on sale, and no one buys it, you will ask, “what’s wrong with people?” 

 

Knowing your genre and readers will help your writing process

genres

Understanding that you are writing in a specific genre and for a defined demographic helps you in so many ways.

If you plan well, it will be so much easier to write your book.

But when it comes to publishing, it will be much clearer to you which two genre categories and seven keywords you will choose to best suit your book.

By doing this, you will help your book’s discoverability and saleability chances.

When you plan your book launch, you will have a much better idea of how to answer the how, where, when and why questions.

For example, if your book is about house training a puppy, make contact with some pet blogs and see if you can guest post, or even advertise your book. Do the same if your book is a memoir on surviving loss or a self-help about migraines.

When your book is on sale, your planning will help you target your book promotion more precisely. Our sister site, Whizbuzz Books has been helping authors promote their books for many years.

If you run a Facebook Ads campaign, you can focus down on the specific gender, age, interests and location.

You will be wasting a lot of money on a campaign broadly targeting the US and UK, age 18-65, interests-books.

If your book is a Tudor romance, you might try UK, South England, female, age 40-55, interests-period romance books.

Similarly for social media in general. What use would there be in promoting a book about preparing for retirement on Instagram?

If it is a political thriller set in current times in Washington, Facebook would be a waste of time, but Twitter could certainly be a winning strategy.

Knowing who your potential readers are, is a huge advantage.

 

Now start writing your book

start

Now that you have your story outline finished, and you know your precise genre, write your story.

But from word one, visualise your reader in your mind. Imagine that they are sitting in front of you and you are telling them your story.

If you are writing a teen paranormal romance, make a picture in your mind’s eye of three or four teenage girls listening intently as you tell them your tale.

If you are writing a cosy mystery, imagine your reader, with legs curled up on a sofa, and a box of chocolates.

When you can vividly imagine your readers, it is amazing how rarely you will strike a bout of writer’s block.

You will know exactly who you are writing for and it will help you turn into a true storyteller.

All writers create a mental image of their imaginary characters, so why not imaginary readers?

Sure, it’s a mental thing. But if you can grab the attention of your imaginary readers, you are on your way to hopefully get the attention of real book buyers when you publish your book.

 

Stay motivated and get it done

motivation

Don’t aim for perfection as you write.

Use your motivation to write and forget about agonising over grammar, sentence structure or even your word count.

Just follow your outline plan and get your story out of your mind and into words on pages.

It doesn’t matter if it takes you weeks or months, simply focus all your energy and attention on getting your words written.

Finishing your first draft is the most important part of writing a book. No book has ever been published without one.

There will be plenty of work to do after you have finished. A second and third draft, editing, line editing, proofreading and beta reading just to start with.

But all of this work is mechanical. It is not creative.

The only creative action in writing a book is in writing your first draft.

So don’t allow your creativity to be handicapped by thinking about all the mechanical aspects such as passives, cleft sentences, commas or run on sentences.

Stay motivated and just write, write, write.

When you finish writing your first draft of your manuscript, you will have written a book – for your readers.

 

How to write a book and then sell it

1. Start with a great idea.

2. Turn your idea into a detailed outline.

3. Look at your book outline and decide who is going to read it.

4. Decide on your very precise genre.

5. Start writing your book, but always with your target reader in mind.

6. Prepare a launch plan before you publish.

7. Promote your book to its defined target market after you publish.

 

Further reading: What Is Point Of View In Story Writing?

 

Part Three – The lighter side of a writing life

The Ten Golden Rules Of How To Write A Book

How to write a book in ten easy to forget steps

This has been a long read for you. Let’s lighten things up a little and have some fun.

Have you started writing a fiction book? Are you thinking about becoming a famous author of fiction or non-fiction?

If so, read on. I would like to share with you the ten golden rules that are necessary for unsuccessful book writing.

If you have started writing a book and don’t want to get to bestseller status super fast, then keep reading.

Some of these ten golden rules are hard work. Others are very technical or need good writing habits. While others need hours and hours of practice and perfection every day.

If you have never written a book before, the complexity of these rules might surprise you. 

But don’t worry, I am sure you will see the benefits very fast once you start following my advice. Are you ready to learn?

 

My ten golden rules on how to write a book and not get people to buy thousands of copies

 

1. Always Add Blank Pages

Always include a lot of blank pages at the back of your book because this makes your book a bit thicker. It will look like much better value to book buyers. It also reduces your actual writing time.

With ebooks, this trick works as well as it does in a book. It makes the percentage read line a lot longer.

It will fool readers into thinking that they have a lot more pages left to read. But in fact, they don’t have that many left to read at all.

With some books, reaching the end sooner than anticipated might even be a huge relief for the reader. It pays to think about the little things you can do for your readers when you write a book.

 

2. Make Very Clear Mistakes

Here is some good writing advice. Be consistent with your typos and spelling mistakes. Avoid using useful online grammar and spellcheckers because they will really mess with your consistency.

Cambridge University says that a reader’s brain can adjust quickly to what you have written. So keep your boo-boos very regular and uniform.

But concentrate hard on the first and last letter of your words. If you get them right, you are good to go.

Cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid. Aoccdrnig to rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn’t mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae.

 

3. Yes, Exploit Your Mother

Always dedicate your book to your mother. Say how she helped you and suffered your pain. How she spent long nights with you adding and deleting commas.

It increases the aaawwww factor dramatically. It also gives you an opportunity to include yet another blank page after it.

 

4. Change Your Name

If you have a long name, change it.

Bestselling successful authors must restrict their names to six letters or fewer. Then your name will be in enormously tall, big and bold letters on the front cover. You know, like KING.

I wonder if Stephen King changed his name to fit it on a book cover? Or was he just born lucky?

Long names reduce the font height by an exponential factor for each letter after the sixth.

If your name is ten letters or more, expect readers to need a magnifying glass to find it on the cover. For many writers, meaningless initials are also, of course, mandatory.

 

5. Get Old Fast

If you are under fifty, do not put a photo of yourself on the back cover of your book. Writers must look mature, experienced, sage and well, old. This applies, particularly to a nonfiction book. You need to be a sage.

If you really want your photo on the back cover, do a bit of magic with Photoshop. Add some wrinkles, glasses and grey hair. Once you’ve aged yourself a little bit, then you can add your photo on the back cover.

 

6. Ditch The Narrative

Use a lot of dialogue in your book. This is because it takes up a lot more page space. It helps with point one in making your book much thicker.

The narrative tends to be in tidy, solid paragraphs. So stay clear of long, neat, economical space saving paragraphs as much as possible.

Use brief, very short dialogue lines of only a few words. You will have written a tome in no time at all. The hardest part of the writing process is, well, writing. So take this shortcut.

“It’s easy,” he said.

“I agree,” she said.

“Do you?”

“Yes, I do.”

“Why?”

“I don’t know.”

 

7. I Love This Book And The Author Too

Get your very best friend, mother or spouse to write the book review blurb for the back of your book. They love you and will only say very nice things about you and your book.

They will say how much you have helped people throughout your life. And that you love kids, puppy dogs and little kittens.

They probably never got around to reading your masterpiece. Perhaps they don’t even know the name of the main character. But who cares?

You wrote a book of fiction. So your mother, spouse or best friend can write something fictitious too.

 

8. And, But, So

Another good idea is to use very short, simple words. Words comprising of more than six letters can be confusing for some readers. Never overestimate your readers’ ability to read. Always underestimate it, to be kind.

Interminably elongated words foreshorten your probable market perspective to exclusively those readers with an elevated intelligence quotient.

 

9. Maybe, Use Some Punctuation

When you sit down to start writing every morning, always start your first new sentence with a Capital letter. Oh, and try to remember the full stop (period) at the end. It helps readers navigate the text a little better.

Avoid using semicolons though; as no one really knows how to use them. If in doubt about your punctuation — use an em dash — as it always works.

 

10. There’s A Story, One Hopes

Make sure you have some sort of story to tell and that you don’t just copy and paste stuff that isn’t yours.

This goes for writing fiction, as well as non-fiction books too.

If you copy the some of the good bits from Harry Potter, it’s called plagiarism, which is not a nice word. It’s also very difficult to remember how to spell.

So, make sure that you do write all the new words you’ve written yourself.

Three hundred and eighty pages of Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, sapien platea morbi dolor lacus nunc, nunc ullamcorper. Felis aliquet egestas vitae, nibh ante quis quis dolor sed mauris. Erat lectus sem ut lobortis, adipiscing ligula eleifend, sodales fringilla mattis dui nullam, even with chapter titles, has also proven not to sell very well.

Even though, admittedly, it does speed up the process of writing a hell of a lot.

 

Bonus Eleventh Rule: The End

Readers seem to like having a neat ending to a story. So make sure you tidy up all the loose ends that you created in your story and don’t just leave them …..

 

Further Reading: Bad Words And Weak Words That Every Writer Should Avoid

 

Conclusion

It is a hackneyed expression that everyone has a book inside them. But it has some truth.

There is nothing holding you back from writing a book, so if you have the desire and motivation, do it.

At the end of the process, you will feel very proud of your achievement, because it will mean that you can now leave more than just footprints in the sand.

Now, is it time for you to write your book?

 

More reading: Choose Your Free Book Writing Software

 

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Derek Haines

Derek Haines is an Australian author, living in Switzerland.

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